<div dir="ltr"><div>Thanks for the tip about checking with the mountpoint command.</div><div><br></div>I see that rm has the option --one-file-system that if I would remember to use I would also probably remember to umount. sigh. Maybe the --one-file-system should be the default for rm -rf. How often do you really want to remove things that are on different filesystems?</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 17, 2015 at 8:05 AM, Sarah Newman <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:newmans@sonic.net" target="_blank">newmans@sonic.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class="">On 12/17/2015 08:02 AM, kevin dankwardt wrote:<br>
&gt; I have found that the benefit of systemd-nspawn binding mounting/umounting dev,sys,proc handy. Plus when I remove the directory afterwards I don&#39;t<br>
&gt; have to make sure I umounted the bind mounts. I&#39;ve killed a machine a couple of times already because I forgot to undo the bind mount before doing a<br>
&gt; rm -rf on a directory I had been using for chroot.<br>
<br>
</span>I added a &quot;! mountpoint /dir&quot; check to one of our scripts before doing an rm -rf for that reason.<br>
<br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature">visit <a href="http://www.kcomputing.com" target="_blank">www.kcomputing.com</a> for the best in Linux developer training.</div>
</div>