<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Nov 12, 2015 at 10:57 AM, Sarah Newman <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:newmans@sonic.net" target="_blank">newmans@sonic.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
If there&#39;s data it can&#39;t read, I would use ddrescue to copy the entire disk to an image. ddrescue has a way to keep track of data it can&#39;t read, so if<br>
you make two copies (one with the stuff it can&#39;t read set to 0 and one where the stuff it can&#39;t read is set to 1) you can do an md5sum on each (using<br>
both /dev/loop0 and /dev/loop1) and compare the md5sums to find corrupted files. I can&#39;t recall exactly how to do this off the top of my head, but I<br>
can try to dig it up if you aren&#39;t able to figure it out.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Sorry for the top post (didn&#39;t read the whole thing).</div><div><br></div><div>I&#39;ve used ddrescue many times with my family&#39;s computers, and it works like a charm.</div><div><br></div><div>After you use it, then I mounted the dd image (in Windows) with a tool like OFS Mount.  After that, I could scan that drive with other tools like Ontrack, Recuva, etc.</div><div><br></div><div>Hope that helps, and feel free to reach out to me directly if you have any questions.</div><div><br></div><div>Rog</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div></div>