<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">Steve Litt wrote:<br>&gt; You have me at a disadvantage because I don&#39;t think I&#39;ve ever seen a<br>&gt; system boot indeterminately, or at least not in the last 10 years.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Rick writes:</div><div>&gt; Anyway, truth to tell, I&#39;m likewise at a disadvantage in attempting to</div><div>&gt; intelligently discuss this problem, being both late to the party and having</div><div>&gt; through either luck or careful avoidance of problem scenarios not seen the</div><div>&gt; referenced problems. </div><div><br></div><div>Steve and Rick, if you look in your dmesg log, you&#39;ll find that the order of devices coming up at boot under the control of the kernel is quite asynchronous.    Kernel developers have a limited ability to sequence operations.   If one device driver doesn&#39;t call the methods of another, or take a reference on the other, they may come up in any old order.   Linux has been becoming increasing asynchronous, preemptible and unpredictable with each passing kernel.   The advent of systemd is a sign that the trends in the kernel are being made visible to userspace.</div><div> </div><div>Akk writes:</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
Things may have changed -- this is based on problems I used to hit<br>
five or so years ago -- but here are two cases that used to cause<br>
indeterminacy:<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>What really causes indeterminacy?   Hardware.   If only that pesky hardware with its variable response times would go away, we wouldn&#39;t have all these problems.</div><div><br></div><div>Why is the Linux kernel becoming so asynchronous?   Because its power management and speed used to stink compared to Windows and iOS on the same hardware.   Don&#39;t take my word for it; look at these Intel slides from 2010:</div><div><br></div><div><a href="https://events.linuxfoundation.org/slides/2010/linuxcon2010_brown.pdf">https://events.linuxfoundation.org/slides/2010/linuxcon2010_brown.pdf</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>Len Brown is a Linux developer employed by Intel.   I see no reason to think that his numbers are not valid.</div><div><br></div><div>That was 2010.   If Linux&#39;s power management were still that bad, Android phones would trail iOS and Windows Phone handsets by so far in battery lifetime that Android would not be viable.    Yes, I know that Android phones run almost exclusively on ARM processors.   The true beauty of open source is that Intel&#39;s quite considerable efforts on power management on big iron in data centers helps rival processors in the embedded space as well.</div><div><br></div><div>The operating system market remains highly competitive.   I believe that Linux may be *losing* market share to QNX in automotive, where I work, for example.   Lightweight RTOS like Xen-based OpenMirage may give Linux a run for its money not only in the cloud but on devices as well.   iOS is ever more profitable.   Nowhere does desktop Linux factor into any business&#39;s development plans, because desktop Linux generates little revenue and less profit.</div><div><br></div><div>Best wishes,</div><div>Alison, returning to lurking</div></div><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature">Alison Chaiken                           <a href="mailto:alison@she-devel.com" target="_blank">alison@she-devel.com</a><br>650-279-5600                            http://{<a href="http://she-devel.com" target="_blank">she-devel.com</a>,<a href="http://exerciseforthereader.org" target="_blank">exerciseforthereader.org</a>}<br>Never underestimate the cleverness of advertisers, or mischief makers, or criminals.  -- Don Norman<br><br></div>
</div></div>